Adjustable Nylon Goat Hobble

Item #WEAAA

$11.99

$12.95

Adjustable Nylon Goat Hobble

  • Adjustable Nylon Goat Hobble Image 1
  • Adjustable Nylon Goat Hobble Image 2
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The Weaver Adjustable Hobble for Goats is designed with a hook and loop closure for easy leg cuff adjustment, these hobbles are made from 2" black nylon webbing. Durable nickel plated hardware. Read More

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Description

Weaver Adjustable Hobble for Goats

Hobble with a hook and loop closure for easy leg cuff adjustment, these hobbles are made from 2" black nylon webbing.

The center strap measures 2" x 3½" long. Durable nickel plated hardware.


Attributes

  • Brand: Weaver Leather
  • Type: Hobbles

Reviews (3)

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  1. 5.0 out of 5 stars

    "Meh"

    They are too big for my goat so is she really kicks and wiggles she can get them off. Got thse because our FF doesnt stand nicely for milking, and has kicked my daughter, stepped in the pail, knocked over the pail countless times....so kind of disappointed. Also, after a few uses (maybe 10?) they started to fray.

  2. 5.0 out of 5 stars

    "Does not work"

    My goat manages to shake them down to ankles and step out of them. Some times she shakes the velcro loose. We tried a horse hobble, but she shakes that down to her ankles too. We've anchored the hobble to floor of stanchion-no good. I've tried roping her legs to floor of stanchion-too much trouble. Solution. I hold her high down with one hand, milk with other while crossing my arm around bucket so her other leg can't kick or enter bucket-repeat on other side. Hey, getting 8lbs of milk (Nubian)2nd time freshner.

  3. 5.0 out of 5 stars

    "Hobble works if in right place"

    One of my goats loves to kick her back legs when being milked. This simple goat hobble works well to keep her from kicking. However note that the photo does NOT show the hobble in the right place on the goat's legs. It must be on their upper legs. I found pictures and good instructions on this website: http://fiascofarm.com/goats/hobble.htm

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